Plain indigo napkins

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So, here are eight hand dyed indigo napkins from my iron/calx/indigo vat. It’s odd, but I feel as though I “know” my napkins after the slow cloth session. I think they are beautiful and I love the slight colour variations in them. 9 dips. 9 rinses. 2 complete washings. After discovering that they weren’t quite dark enough at 7 dips I wasn’t really prepared to spend more time.
But they are now gone. It was a commission, but I also learned a lesson. When I make things I usually think of the person I am gifting them to. This time, I didn’t know the person, and it seemed to be huge amount of time to spend on someone I’m not familiar with. I won’t do a commission again, but I will dye again for family and friends.

Eco-Dyeing

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It’s warm outside, so I’ve been dipping my silks and linens in a variety of simmering pots of natural dyes, and then watching them swish about in the wind to dry. My fav at the moment is blue spruce pine cones and cochineal, or a combo of both. The little indigo seedlings make a precious tiny print , as well. I’m back at it, living in my dream world. Lucky woman. A3D56E9D-3DAA-4A08-9B5C-9A0C5B09D7D6.5E8A2D6C-98A2-45B2-9833-12E79CCE91BA

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More eco- printing

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That addicting dyeing process has been knocking at my door again.  Silk and linen bundles are currently sitting in iron and aluminum pots, filled with neighbourhood plant leaves and debris. Acorns, pine needles, oak leaves, rose leaves, boxwood, smokebush, and a couple of frozen eucalyptus leftover from my daughter’s wedding.  All in the pot. Tiny little bundles wrapped around chopsticks and tied with recycled string from indigo dyeing, are waiting until tomorrow’s reveal.  Boiled for 45 minutes with filtered water, and then insulated in a wool blanket. Can’t wait!